Wednesday 17th Dec 2014
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Purdah versus Nakedness

Society

, by JAVED JAMIL

In response to an article by Farzana Hassan, a Canada based feminist, DR. JAVED JAMIL criticises the Operation Nudity and commercialisation of woman’s beauty.

This pains me that rather than discussing nudity with all its ramifications the world is discussing the Purdah (veil). And what is more painful for me is that some Muslims too have become part of this concerted campaign, which suits the market forces. While it can be argued that Purdah needs to be looked at rather liberally, there is no way nudity can be accepted in a civilized society. But the truth is that society today is not only accepting nakedness in different degrees but is promoting it. Needless to say this is being done by the market forces that have huge interests in the market of sex and nakedness. How can a society be called civilized if it promotes things that are highly dangerous for the peaceful survival of society. There is a bigger need to study the rise of naked culture than the development of Purdah.

Nudity is surely one of the biggest “achievements” of the corporate sector. Nudity needed glorification in order to be popularised. The shame attached to it was to be mercilessly ravished if society had to “develop”. The “Operation Nudity” began with the glorification of nude paintings and graffiti. The artists who marvelled in eroticism were admired as some of the greatest ar­tists of all times. The reason was simple enough: their compositions were portrayals of “reality” and “beauty”. Films also started presenting woman in her full naked glory in the name of art or reality. The opponents were spurned as the enemies of the reality and art. When the money poured in as the result of the depiction of the truth, the truth was eulogised; when it required the falsehood, it was adored as a work of fiction or creative imagination. Women were told: if you have a beautiful body why don’t you exhibit it to the world, as you have the right to be admired for your wonderful curves, sexciting tops and terrific bottoms? The press and the polity too did not lag behind in sensationalising sex. This was often done on the pretext of bringing to light sexual exploita­tion rampant in society. The competitions to find sexiest men and women of the u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">USu003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;"> and other countries can now be watched on satelliten channels.u003c/span>u003c/font>u003c/div> u003cdiv styleu003d"margin:0in 0in 0pt;text-align:justify">u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">u003cfont faceu003d"Times New Roman"> u003c/font>u003c/span>u003c/div> u003cdiv styleu003d"margin:0in 0in 0pt;text-indent:0.5in;text-align:justify">u003cfont faceu003d"Times New Roman">u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">Once the people became habitual of watching or perusing naked­ness, the merchants of sex started glamorising woman's body. The glorification of nakedness meant that women who did not hang back to bare themselves before u003cb>camera were showered upon with the glamorous epithets of “modern” and “ultramodern”. The scenes in which they appeared without giving trouble to a single piece of cloth or having sexualn intimacy with an actor were hailed as “bold” shotsu003c/b>. The party culture had already established itself as a sign of highest social status. The presence of gorgeous ladies in revealing costumes added colour and tempo to the get-togethers. The “bold” women continued to multiply in society as their “boldness” brought them the fame and the glory in addition to the wealth. The fashion-shows and beauty-contests in which the contestants would bare their skin to the sheer delight of the spectators became commoner with every passing year. Such shows would earn the contestants a fortune; the organisers of these extravaganzas would make astronomical dollars and pounds. Miss Universe and Miss World contests are now annually organised in different countries. These megaevents are telecast live all over the world. Pictures of the winners garnish the front pages of the major newspapers. In an obvious attempt to pacify the antagonists, the contestants are asked questions pertaining ton their personal penchants and thoughts. They often, in order to arouse outbursts of clapping, give an­swers laced with humanist sentiments. The replies to the probable questions are of course prepared in advance and rehearsed several times. The venues for these extravaganzas are so chosen as to push up the market in new areas. It could not be without reason that women of ",1] ); //--> US and other countries can now be watched on satellite channels.

Once the people became habitual of watching or perusing naked­ness, the merchants of sex started glamorising woman’s body. The glorification of nakedness meant that women who did not hang back to bare themselves before camera were showered upon with the glamorous epithets of “modern” and “ultramodern”. The scenes in which they appeared in minimum dress without giving trouble to a single piece of cloth or having sexual intimacy with an actor were hailed as “bold” shots. The party culture had already established itself as a sign of highest social status. The presence of gorgeous ladies in revealing costumes added colour and tempo to the get-togethers. The “bold” women continued to multiply in society as their “boldness” brought them the fame and the glory in addition to the wealth. The fashion-shows and beauty-contests in which the contestants would bare their skin to the sheer delight of the spectators became commoner with every passing year. Such shows would earn the contestants a fortune; the organisers of these extravaganzas would make astronomical dollars and pounds. Miss Universe and Miss World contests are now annually organised in different countries. These mega events are telecast live all over the world. Pictures of the winners garnish the front pages of the major newspapers. In an obvious attempt to pacify the antagonists, the contestants are asked questions pertaining to their personal penchants and thoughts. They often, in order to arouse outbursts of clapping, give an­swers laced with humanist sentiments. The replies to the probable questions are of course prepared in advance and rehearsed several times. The venues for these extravaganzas are so chosen as to push up the market in new areas. It could not be without reason that women of u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">Indiau003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;"> became the most glamorous ladies of the world all of a sudden in 1994 and seized the Miss Universe and the Miss World title. It was also not without reason that the 1996 Miss Universe contest was staged in u003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">Indiau003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">, and that it was preceded by the arrival in Bombay of Michael Jackson the greatest dancing star of the present world. Obviously, all these events were the outcome of the “open” market policies of the government of u003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">Indiau003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">; and u003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">Indiau003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">, being perhaps the biggest potential market, started attracting multinational companies. Since then u003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">Indiau003c/span>u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;"> has produced several miss worlds. To stir up mass hysteria for Western style of living, the satellite TV commenced its operation as soon as the government exhibited willingness to “reform” its economic policies that would suit the market. The globalisation of nudity goes on. Where it stops only time will tell. u003cb>This glorification has led ton pornography, prostitution and promiscuity, the trio that has become the greatest tormentor of humanity. It kills millions every year, devastates families and disturbs social equanimity. Women and children are the biggest sufferers.u003c/b>u003c/span>u003c/font>u003c/div> u003cdiv styleu003d"margin:0in 0in 0pt;text-indent:0.5in;text-align:justify">u003cspan langu003d"EN-GB" styleu003d"font-size:10.5pt;">u003cfont faceu003d"Times New Roman"> u003c/font>u003c/span>u003c/div>",1] ); //--> India became the most glamorous ladies of the world all of a sudden in 1994 and seized the Miss Universe and the Miss World title. It was also not without reason that the 1996 Miss Universe contest was staged in India, and that it was preceded by the arrival in Bombay of Michael Jackson the greatest dancing star of the present world. Obviously, all these events were the outcome of the “open” market policies of the government of India; and India, being perhaps the biggest potential market, started attracting multinational companies. Since then India has produced several miss worlds. To stir up mass hysteria for Western style of living, the satellite TV commenced its operation as soon as the government exhibited willingness to “reform” its economic policies that would suit the market. The globalisation of nudity goes on. Where it stops only time will tell. This glorification has led to pornography, prostitution and promiscuity, the trio that has become the greatest tormentor of humanity. It kills millions every year, devastates families and disturbs social equanimity. Women and children are the biggest sufferers.

Talented women like Farzana Hassan should launch a full-fledged campaign against nakedness if they are true champions of women’s status. Women have to be freed from the clutches of the market that has turned them into nothing but tools for the satisfaction of men’s desires. Mrs Farzana lives in a country where she can create history by launching a campaign against commercial exploitation of women. If such a campaign starts, the rest of the world will perhaps better realise the importance of Purdah.
[The author can be reached at javedjamil@rediffmail.com]


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